CS2 - The Fixed Percent System

All applications commenced after 3 March 2003 were dealt with under the fixed percentage child support system which was much simpler than the old calculation method but still by no means easy.

Under the CS2 system the child support payable by the father is calculated as follows:-

Determine your net income.  This is gross pay less tax, less national insurance and all pension scheme contributions.

  1. Determine how many children live with you. Net income is then reduced by 15% for one child living with you, 20% for two, 25% for three or more.

 

  1. Apply the basic child support calculation. 15% of net pay (after deduction for any children living with you) for one child, 20% for two, 25% for three or more.

 

  1. Calculate and reduce by any amount of shared care. Shared care is calculated by determining the number of nights your child stays with you.  If a child stays with you below 52 nights per annum (1 night per week) the amount of child support is unchanged.  If the amount of contact is between 52 and 103 nights per annum (1 night per week) the child support is reduced by one-seventh.  If the child stays with the you between 104 and 155 nights per annum the amount of child support is reduced by two-sevenths.  If the contact amounts to between 156 and 174 nights per annum (three nights per week) the child support is reduced by three-sevenths.  Contact in excess of 175 nights per annum reduces the child support figure by 50% since in effect the child spends as much time with you as it does with their mother.  Furthermore, in those cases an extra sum of £7 for each of your children that stays overnight with you in excess of 175 nights per annum is deducted.

You should note that the CS2 system does not include any enquiry into your partner’s earnings or indeed the mother’s earnings.  Furthermore, all children that live with you are taken into account, even if you are not the natural father of those children and even if their natural father is paying child support.

In most cases it would be simple, if you are living on your own you would pay 15% for one child, 20% for two, 25% if  you have three or more.  If you have more than one child by more than one mother who doesn’t live with you then the amount payable is determined by the percentage and divided equally between the mothers concerned.  For instance if you’re earning £300 per week with three children to support, two by mother (A) and one by mother (B) would pay £75 per week.  Mother (A) having two children would receive £50 of that, mother (B) would receive £25.